Category Archives: Play and Fun Activities

Young Children and Zoom

a child looking at a mobile device

I don’t think the developers at Zoom (or Skype or Microsoft Teams) ever predicted that their software would become a platform for parent-toddler classes and online preschool!

And during coronavirus, all the parents who used to try to minimize screen time for their young children now find they need to utilize it as their child’s primary way to connect to people outside their household. How do we make the experience as rich and as developmentally appropriate as we can?

These tips can be helpful whether you’re a parent planning a call between your child and their grandparent, or you’re a preschool teacher planning a class for a dozen kids.

Before the Call

Choose a good time of day when the child is relaxed and attentive.

It doesn’t have to be a long call and a big deal – it’s fine to do short calls. A few minutes here and there is great for some kids. On the other hand, it’s also fine to have long calls. I know one family in Seattle where the grandmother in China “comes for breakfast” every day (before grandma turns in for the night.) She “sits at the table” with them, and chats with the children as the parents get ready for the day.

Before the call, gather anything you’ll want to use during the call: books, instruments, and show & tell items so that no one has to step away from the computer during the call – that might cause the child to lose interest.

Prepare the child. Talk about what will happen and how long the visit will be. Remind them who they will be speaking to and what they talked about last time.

Consider staying nearby. Young children may be best able to engage with a zoom call if they’re sitting on their parent’s lap or the parent is sitting beside them. (Note, some organizations, like Outschool, require that adults be off camera, but when I teach preschool age children on Outschool, I find that the children who do best in class often have an adult right next to them – I’ll see the parent’s arm reach in to help out. Once children have done several classes, they no longer need that active support, and you may be able to step away and get things done while they’re on a call.)

Teach them to un-mute. The host can mute the child, but not all systems allow the host to un-mute, so be sure the child knows how to un-mute. There are a few choices: if you have a touch screen, the easiest may be to teach them to tap the bottom corner of the screen to bring up the command bar, then tap on the mic icon. Other options: moving the mouse cursor to the bottom of the screen and clicking on the microphone (this can be hard for little ones), pressing alt-a, or holding down the space bar (note: as soon as they let go of the space bar they return to muted.)

Over time, help your child learn Zoom skills to be more independent in the call: how to mute, how to chat, how to use the reactions like clapping, how to share screen. How to place a call. Help them understand what’s happening when their screen buddy “freezes.”

During the Call

Have familiar rituals – perhaps the same greeting each time, or the same song each time – these cues help a young child to remember who they’re speaking to and reconnect.

The remote person should speak slowly and clearly. The person in the room with the child can repeat questions and comments from either side, as needed.

The remote person should look directly at the camera – this will feel like eye contact to the child. Don’t be tempted to look at other distractions while talking. Use a lot of gestures, body language, and big facial expressions – it’s much more engaging.

Stay unmuted as much as possible so everyone in the call can hear each other and feel as though they’re in the same room.

Consider using a mobile device like a tablet or laptop so you can move around and show each other new things.

Some children focus better if eating a snack while talking – for others, that is distracting. Some children focus better if they have some simple toys nearby to hold in their hands and play with during the call. Others may find that distracting.

Let the child know when the call is nearing its end, and make a clear ending. (Maybe a song, or a story, or something to signal the ending.) Talk about when you’ll “meet” again.

Making Video Chats Interactive

Here are ideas for interactive activities to try out:

  • Play Peek a Boo. Normal style, or by covering the camera and uncovering it.
  • Read Stories. If you have a physical copy of a book, you can hold it up and read it. Or you can scan in pictures of the pages and share those as you read. Or find a YouTube of a read aloud book, but mute their video, and read along with your voice.
  • Sing Songs. With audio lag you can’t sing in unison or it sounds awful. But you CAN take turns singing.
  • Silly Faces. Take turns – who can make the silliest face? (Spotlight them.)
  • Pretend to Be – Take turns pretending to be different animals, or whatever.
  • What is My Stick? Hold up a stick. Demonstrate how it could be a fishing pole, or a baseball bat. Try a few more and ask them to guess what it is.
  • Use Props. Puppet shows can be fun!
  • Make Art Together. Get out art supplies on each end, and draw pictures together. Hold them up to the camera from time to time to share your work.
  • Show and Tell – each person brings an item to show to people and to talk about.
  • Play Guessing Games.
  • Share a travelogue – each person takes pictures of their day, and shares it with the other on the next call.
  • Dance Party. Put on some music and dance!! (Learn how to make music work well on Zoom.)
  • Talent Show – Take turns demonstrating special talents you have: telling jokes, crazy dances, singing songs, patting your head and rubbing your belly…
  • Progressive Stories. One person starts a story: “Once upon a time, a polka-dotted elephant…” then the next person continues “… boarded a spaceship headed for… “
  • Would you Rather? “would you rather ______ or _______”
  • I Spy: Do a google search for “I spy pictures.” Choose one, then share your screen and play I Spy together.
  • Play Simon Says.
  • Play Tic Tac Toe, Hangman, and other pencil and paper games on the Zoom whiteboard.
  • Guess How Many. Person A fills a container with objects (20 pennies? 30 mini marshmallows?) and shows it to Person B. They have to guess how many objects there are, then they count them together. On the next call it’s B’s turn.
  • Scavenger Hunt. Name an object – they run and find it in the house and bring it back.
  • Find the Hidden Object. The remote adult can conspire with the in-house adult. The in-house adult hides an object before the call. During the call, the remote adult can give clues to help the child find the treasure.
  • Pretend to Share Snacks. Plan ahead and have both of you have the same food to eat together. Make it a fancy tea party if you’d like.
  • Go on a walktogether” with mobile devices. Share what you see.
  • Go on a field trip “together.” Lots of zoos, aquariums, and museums have created virtual field trips or have “panda-cams” and such. Go on one together by sharing your screen and talking about what you see. You could also do virtual tourism together. My mother-in-law has found a whole world of “virtual walking tours” on YouTube and goes for walks all over the world every day in her living room.
  • Watch movies together. Share a screen and talk as you watch.
  • For older children (elementary on up), there’s lots more ideas here: https://janelledurham.com/games-interaction-on-zoom/.

I also like this suggestion from Zero to Three: “Be the “hands and heart” of the the person on-screen. When the screen partner “tickles” your baby’s tummy, give your child’s tummy a tickle, too. When a grandparent leans toward the screen to “kiss” your toddler, you can give him a kiss on the cheek. By taking this role, you help nurture the relationship between the child and their on-screen friend.”

Long Distance Babysitters

During the coronavirus stay-at-home time, many parents have been with their children 24/7 for a long time with few breaks. You can use a video chat as a “babysitter” to get you a break. Have your child talk with grandpa, or an aunt, or a friend while you rest. If you have a very young child, you may need to be in the same room but at least the child’s attention is captured by someone else. For older children, you may be able to be elsewhere in the house, and let your child know where to find you. I know some parents of elementary age kids who will go for a walk in the neighborhood while their child is online – the remote adult has their cell phone number and can reach them immediately if needed.

Internet Safety

This blog is primarily aimed at parents of kids age 1 to 6, so I assume the parents are nearby during video calls, and keeping their eyes and ears on what is happening. If you have an older child who may be making video calls independently to friends, here are some helpful safety tips: https://www.protectyoungminds.org/2019/02/19/11-safe-video-chat-rules-you-probably-havent-taught-your-kids/.

Audio Quality

If the person on the other end seems to have a hard time hearing you: Figure out whether you need to add an external microphone to make your child audible (especially if they’re speaking with an older person whose hearing isn’t what it used to be). Children tend to have quiet voices and may be hard to hear over a video chat if the internal mic on your device isn’t great. Plus they wiggle around a lot and don’t always stay near the mic. You can test your mic – use the “voice recorder” app on your computer and record your child talking, then play it back. If you can hear it with your speaker volume at any setting, it’s fine. But if you can only hear the recording if you crank your speakers up to 80 or 90 out of 100, then consider buying a mic. (Click for more tips about audio settings.)

Resources

If you’re teaching classes to young children, here’s a handout you can send to the parents about help your child succeed on Zoom.

Here are some of the sources I used when writing this.

What the research tells us about developmental impacts of video chat vs. other screen time for kids: https://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2016/10/03/496362094/could-video-chats-be-good-for-your-infant

More about managing screen time during coronavirus time: https://gooddayswithkids.com/2020/05/22/screen-time-in-coronavirus-time/

If you need a tutorial to the basics of how to use Zoom, or any of the advanced features of Zoom, check out my Guide to Zoom.

And, to get a break from the screen: https://inventorsoftomorrow.com/2020/03/26/connecting-to-outdoors-during-coronavirus/ 

McAuliffe Park – Kirkland

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After 30 years on the Eastside, and 6 in Kirkland, I had never been to McAuliffe park. I’d driven by on 116th countless times, but from the road, it didn’t look like much, so I never stopped in. But then on the Kirkland Rocks Facebook page, people would often post that they’d hidden beautiful painted rocks at McAuliffe for kids to find. So, finally we went. And this park is a unique gem!

It’s at 10824 NE 116th Street; halfway between Totem Lake and Juanita Village.

It’s 11.6 acres, with lots and lots of wide open lawn, shady orchard trees to throw out a picnic blanket below, a playground, picnic tables, nature trails, a community pea patch with 35 plots, an antique barn, 2 windmills, and lots of ancient rusted farm equipment and old gas station memorabilia to explore.

The community learning garden features permaculture principles, annual vegetables grown with organic practices, a new rain garden, and water and resource conservation. The Tilth Alliance offer classes at the park.

The property was homesteaded in 1877, and only two families owned it between that time and when the Kirkland Parks department acquired it in a series of purchases from the 1990’s through 2017. Read more (and see more pictures) on Active Rain, and in the Master Plan report. (Note: the master plan from 2005 had grand visions for the site, but it does not appear most of them were implemented.

We visited in the midst of coronavirus season, and there were maybe 30 people we saw there, spread out over 12 acres, so easy to socially distance! The playground was closed when we were there, due to quarantine, but people were hard at work in their plots in the community garden, and a few families were relaxing in the shade. It struck me as a great place to take 3 – 8 year old children where the parent(s) could sit and relax and the kids could run quite a ways, and play while still being safely in the parents’ sight. There’s even some nice low climbing trees.

It’s a park well worth visiting when you’re in the mood for a little wandering around and exploring or a little sitting under a tree reading a good book.

 

 

Low Contact Parks on the Eastside

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Update on 11/12:

Current state guidelines on outdoor activities do allow for outdoor activities such as walking, hiking, running or biking at each phase of re-opening. In phase 1 it’s only with people from your household. Phase 2 allows for outdoor recreation involving five or fewer people outside your household, camping, beaches, some sporting activities.

State recommendations and King County recommendations are

  • people with flu-like symptoms should not participate,
  • know before you go – check to be sure you know the status of the park before going (I’ve tried to include links below for finding the current status)
  • stay close to home – this is not the time to travel long distances (could carry disease with you) and prepare for facilities to be closed (bathrooms may not always be available) – bring your own food, water, and hand sanitizer
  • practice physical distancing – use face masks in any situation where distancing is not possible

And please, Please, PLEASE respect the guidelines!!! If lots of people violate them, the parks get closed down again. 😦

Choosing a Less Traveled Path

When planning an outing, the first parks that come to mind are the most popular ones – Green Lake, Alki Beach, Marymoor, Rattlesnake Ridge. But these can get crowded. But in King County, we are blessed with so many fabulous public spaces outdoors. Here are some less well known gems to consider for your walks during this time. (Some of these are bike-friendly, some are not: check bike maps for bike trails.)

If a park has a playground you would have to pass by to get to the trails, I’ll make a note, because when playgrounds are closed, I know it could be super hard for some little ones to see a playground and be told they couldn’t play there. Below, I’ll link to websites for city parks departments. Here’s the current status of King County parks, and Washington state parks.

Bellevue

Bellevue Parks has over 2700 acres of parks and open space and over 90 miles of trails! There’s a map of Bellevue Parks here. Here are the current covid-19 policies for Bellevue parks.  Some options to try out:

Lake to Lake Trail System is ten miles of trails. You could park at many spots along the way and just do a portion of the walk. The Lake Hills Greenbelt is from Phantom Lake to Larsen Lake. Larsen Lake Blueberry Farm has plenty of room for wandering up and down the rows.

Coal Creek Natural Trail is near the Cougar Mountain trails, but has fewer hikers.

Lakemont Park is 16 acres with 3 miles of trails. (The playground is right next to the parking lot, but if you’d rather avoid that part of the park, you could park at the nearby shopping center and there’s a footbridge into the park.)

Lewis Creek has a 2.3 mile walk that takes you through wetlands and meadows. (Playground at one end, but easy to avoid.)

Mercer Slough is 320 acres. It’s got multiple trails to hike to view wetlands and meadow.

There are three parks I know of that you might never know had a mile or more of hiking hidden in them.  Robinswood Park – near Bellevue College. Here’s a trail map, with one of our favorite trails through the woods marked out on it. Ardmore Park – near Microsoft.  Zumdieck is just north of downtown, and has a nice little loop through the woods. These are all great hikes for younger kids – I’ve done them with many three year olds, also good for elders who aren’t looking for an endurance hike. All three have playgrounds.

If you want a more challenging, straight uphill in the woods hike, try the Weowna Park Trail up hill from Lake Sammamish.

If you’re just looking for a place to sit and read or have non-social play, there’s also tons more parks, both big and small. Some have playgrounds, some don’t. There are also lots of “mini-parks” and “corner parks” that aren’t much more than some grass, some trees and a picnic table. (We ate at one of those the other day, but we threw a blanket out on the lawn rather than sitting at the table, where virus concentrations might be higher.) Check on the Bellevue Parks website to learn more. And more Bellevue trails are listed here. Click here for: Bellevue’s covid-19 restrictions.

Crowded Parks – may want to avoid

Avoid Downtown Bellevue Park – it’s often crowded on sunny days – leave this to the folks who live downtown and may not have cars. Same thing for Crossroads Park, which can be crowded and is in another neighborhood where lots of folks don’t have cars to take them to other options. I would leave Bridle Trails for the horse folks to get the outings that they and their animals need. I would avoid the barn area at Kelsey Creek park which may be more crowded (and may be closed), but there is a nice .9 mile walking trail there, which should be fine.

Kirkland

Here’s the Kirkland Parks map. Here are the current covid-19 policies for Kirkland parks. Some parks to try:

McAuliffe Park (between Totem Lake and Juanita Beach) is a big park with wide open grassy fields, shade trees, an ancient barn, vintage farm equipment and wind mills.

OO Denny – north of Juanita, near the Kenmore border. Nice beach area. (There’s a playground there.) What many people don’t notice is that on the other side of the road, up the hill, there’s a few miles of fabulous wooded trails (here’s a trail map with points of interest). It’s a pretty challenging steep climb, but beautiful. When we went on a beautiful day in late April, we hiked two hours, and passed maybe 20 people.

Big Finn Hill is also on the border of Kirkland and Kenmore. It’s got 9.5 miles of trails back behind the playground.

Carillon Woods – near Northwest College. Some trails into the woods, pretty hilly. I wrote a post about it, though it mostly covers the playgrounds, which are closed now.

Edith Moulton – between Totem Lake and Juanita. Here’s the schematic for when it was re-designed, which includes detailed maps. It’s got a nice easy walking loop.

Juanita Bay (around the corner from Juanita Beach) has a nice path to look over the lake. You may see turtles. The boardwalk there has looked a little crowded when we’ve driven by near dinner times.

There’s also some parks I know nothing about, like “Cotton Hill Park – undeveloped.” Looks like it at least has a trail? Juanita Heights, Kingsgate and Norway Hill also have trails.

Places to sit and read/work outside: Everest Park – I like parking at their north parking lot and sitting by the stream. (The playground is out of sight from there.) Peter Kirk in downtown Kirkland, Terrace Park in Houghton – both of those have playgrounds.

Parks to Avoid

Here are some parks I normally love… but they’re basically small parks with big playgrounds, that are closed, so if that would make your small child sad, avoid Tot Lot, Phyllis Needy, Reservoir, Van Aalst. On the other hand, they’re a fine place for older kids or adults to spread out a blanket and read, or play frisbee with household members and so on.

Juanita Beach, Marina Park, and Houghton Beach can get really crowded on sunny days. Whenever we’ve gone to Marina Park on a sunny day this year, it has felt a little crowded for my comfort. I mask when I’m walking through, but take my mask off if we’re sitting at a distance from others.

Kenmore

Here is Kenmore’s Covid-19 info.

Rhododendron Park has a short trail – a nice amble for a young child or an elder.

Wallace Swamp Creek has trails, but I haven’t had the chance to check it out. (Note, this is NOT an off leash dog park, but some people are under the impression it is, so there may be loose dogs there.)

Burke-Gilman Trail. This is a 20 mile long trail, but portions of it go through Kenmore. It’s paved, so great for bikes, roller blades, strollers. It is quite busy on sunny weekends, but probably a decent option for a cloudy, gray weekday. We have found the Kenmore stretches to be less busy than the Seattle zones.

St. Edward’s State Park. Lots of great trails. Definitely too busy on a sunny weekend, but would be a good outing on a rainy weekday. Large playground – it’s possible to park a ways away and walk away from it, and they might not notice. It’s a state park, so you need a Discover Pass, or it’s $10 to park there.

Here are more Kenmore parks,

Redmond

There are 59 miles of public trails in the City of Redmond! Current covid-19 info for Redmond parks. The City of Redmond website doesn’t provide a lot of detailed information on the trails; however, you can find more info about them on the All Trails website or app, on the Washington Trails Association website or TrailLink.

Trail names to look up:

  • Watershed Preserve Trails, off of Novelty Hill Road. 800 acres, with multiple trail options from 0.6 short loops to 4.3 mile hikes. Beautiful walk through green – moss, ferns, trees, ponds…. beautiful. There’s a lot of tree cover, so it’s good for rainy day hikes.
  • Tolt Pipeline Trail – 11 miles, Duvall to Bothell. Bridle Crest Trail, 3.3 miles from Bridle Trails to just north of Microsoft – it runs where 60th St would be if 60th went through.
  • The Marymoor Connector Trail is a 1.6 mile trail through Marymoor Park. It’s an easy walk with a stroller or an easy bike ride. It connects the East Lake Sammamish Trail (11 miles, up the east side of the lake) and the Sammamish River Trail (10 miles, Redmond to Bothell)
  • Farrell-McWhirter off Novelty Hill Rd. near Avondale – this is a farm park and there might be more people over by the animals, but there’s also a 1.3 mile trail through the woods. There’s a self-guided orienteering course there.

Or, there’s the 1.5 mile Viewpoint trail in the Tam O’Shanter neighborhood on the border of Redmond and Bellevue.

Parks to Avoid

I would avoid the dog walk at Marymoor unless you have a dog who absolutely requires that much space for running in, just because there’s probably many humans there. The rest of Marymoor has plenty of open space for walking in or sitting outside in while distancing. (Note: Marymoor is in Redmond, but is a county park.)

Snoqualmie / North Bend

If you don’t live there, don’t go there.

I say that because I have a friend in North Bend who says the locals can’t get out to any nearby parks because they’re all over-flowing with day hikers. If you really can’t resist the area, instead of going to Mount Si, at least check out this article on 7 Trails to Try for Better Social Distancing.

Other Areas

Check out this Parent Map article on State Parks near Seattle. It covers Dash Point in Federal Way, Flaming Geyser in Auburn, Bay View in Mt. Vernon, Camano Island, and Salt Water in Des Moines. And this article on Secret Urban Hikes in Seattle area.

Learn about Nature while you’re out

I’ve written a guide to learning about Northwest Native plants, which includes all the major plants you’ll find on a hike outdoors, and also has a couple of scavenger hunts – one for preschool age kids, one for older kids (or adults), and a dichotomous key. Here’s another great Native Plant Field Guide that was developed by someone as her senior year project.

The City of Bellevue has a scavenger hunt for Lewis Creek that could also be used elsewhere. I found that some of the things on it were harder for kids, so I made my own version of the nature scavenger hunt using theirs as a base.

Walking in Your Neighborhood

Or, if you want to stay super close to home, but need to get outdoors (there are LOTS of physical and mental health benefits of time spent outdoors), you can get outdoors with proper social distancing, in ANY neighborhood. If you’re an adult walking alone, try listening to some great podcasts as you walk, or use this time to call and connect with a friend or family member. If you’re walking with kids, and doing the same path over and over, there are lots of ways to liven it up: one day do a search for all the letters in the alphabet (on license plates, street signs, and so on), another day, do a search for all the numbers, another day, play I spy where you take turns spotting things. Some folks are trying to start some coronavirus-time connections, like placing a teddy bear in their window for kids to spot when they’re out walking – keep an eye out in your neighborhood to see if you can find any signs that this is catching on!

When to Go Out

Obviously, if it’s rainy or cool, there will be fewer people out than if it’s gorgeous weather. So, grab a raincoat or an umbrella and head out in any weather.

You may also choose to access the parks at less crowded times – I would suspect that the most crowded times will be lunchtime, maybe a 4 or 5 pm end of the day time, and weekends, since many people are still working regular hours, whether at home or a work place, or attempting to school their kids during “school hours.”

Before you go out

First, let’s be cautious to take as few germs out into the world with us as possible. Things to consider: If you haven’t changed clothes in a few days (no judgment if that’s the case!), do so before going out. Bring a cloth face cover, in case it’s hard to keep enough distance between you and others. Take your temperature to make sure you don’t have a fever. (This is not a perfect precaution, because you can be contagious before symptoms, but still a good step because if you do have a fever, you should definitely stay home.) Go to the bathroom before you leave the house, so you’re less likely to need to do it when you’re out. (And because many parks facilities and bathrooms may be closed.) And wash your hands before going out!

If you have children, explain to them before you leave that this is a “no touch” outing. (Toddlers may not be capable of resisting all the time, but we can do our best.) I would not bring snacks along if I had a little one, since their hands would be in and out of their mouths over and over, maybe transporting germs in and out.

Note: Rails to Trails also offers a helpful article on the latest expert guidance on outdoor activity and covid-19.

When You Get Home

Leave your outdoor things (coats, shoes, purse) by the door. Don’t carry them through the house. Wash your hands! If you were using your phone, you could clean that too.

More Ideas?

If you have more ideas or any feedback, please add it in the comments!

Elsewhere on this blog, I have tips on

Plus the blog is just generally full of tips about parenting kids from birth to age 9.

Outdoor Theatre 2019

Kitsap Forest Theatre, www.foresttheater.com/

Kitsap Forest Theatre, http://www.foresttheater.com/

Outdoor productions of Shakespeare and other plays are a fun way to experience the arts in the summer time. Bring a picnic, spread a blanket out on the grass, and enjoy! (If you prefer sitting in a chair to on the ground, be sure it’s a low profile chair so you don’t block anyone’s view.)

Although you can see Shakespearean tragedies outdoors, I personally prefer big, rollicking shows outdoors – the comedy and music play better in situations where there are Frisbee players in the far distance, dogs sniffing by, and airplanes flying overhead.

Outdoor theater is a good venue for kids because it gives more leeway for squirming and wiggling than an indoor performance with theater rules. However, you should still endeavor to keep kids quiet and well-behaved. Most of the shows listed here are good for ages 7 or 8 and up, but I would save King Lear and Henry IV for teens and up. We have brought preschoolers to shows, but we don’t expect them to pay full attention – bring snacks, toys, and sticker books to entertain them quietly.

Seattle Area:

July 13 and 14 is the Seattle Outdoor Theatre Festival in Volunteer Park in Seattle, which features performances from Wooden O and Greenstage (see above) plus Last Leaf, Theatre Schmeater, Shakespeare NW, 14/48 projects, Versatile Arts, Dacha, Freehold, and Young Shakespeare Workshop. This year, they have several performances labeled “Kids Show!” Free, please donate to support it!

Greenstage Shakespeare in the Park is performing Henry IV, part 2 and Taming of the Shrew this year in Burien, Fall City, Lynnwoood, Maple Valley, and Seattle; their smaller scale Backyard Bard performances are of Merry Wives of Windsor and Measure for Measure at various Seattle parks. Season runs July 12 – August 17. Free, please donate!

Outdoor Trek becomes Outdoor Star Wars… For the past several years, Hello Earth has performed live an episode of Star Trek The Original Series. Simple props like hula hoop and streamer transporters are surprisingly effective and always entertaining. Last year they did Star Wars – A New Hope (R2-D2 on roller skates!), so of course this year is Empire Strikes Back.   Blanche Lavizzo park in Seattle. August 3 – 25. Free. (Donate!!) Schedule here.

Snoqualmie Falls Forest Theatre sadly is not doing a production this year.

Theater Schmeater. 5 performances, July 13 – August 15. Fabulous Fable Factory – The delightful story of an inquisitive youngster who discovers an old factory operated by Mr. Aesop. Seattle parks, free.

Wooden O is doing  Romeo & Juliet (featuring a female and non-binary cast) and Twelfth Night (all male cast). Thurs – Suns: July 11 – August 11. In Bellevue, Des Moines, Edmonds, Federal Way, Issaquah, Lynnwood, Mercer Island, Sea-Tac, Seattle, Tacoma. Free but please donate!

Day Trips or Overnights

Island Shakespeare Festival – Langley. July 5 – September 1. Thursdays – Sundays. Midsummer Night’s Dream, Winter’s Tale, and Inferno (info TBA). Free. (Donate!)

Kitsap Forest Theatre (near Bremerton) is doing Mamma Mia. (They did  Newsies on the weekends from Memorial Day to Father’s Day.) Saturdays and Sundays 2 pm, July 27 – August 18. $34 adults, $18 youth, 6 and under free.

Leavenworth Summer Theatre is presenting Sound of Music, Pirates of Penzance and Hello Dolly. July 6 – August 30, Tuesdays – Saturdays. $14 – 35.

Skagit River Shakespeare Festival (near La Conner, SW of Mt. Vernon). They’ve not yet announced a 2019 season.

Other Summer Arts Opportunities

Library Summer Reading Programs

Library programs for ages 3 – 12 happen all summer long, and include story time and much more.

King County library:  This year’s theme is space themed so the shows are about space, the stars, and science. Go to this page https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/search/index, and you can filter for events that work for you, or type the name of a show you want to see into the search bar at the top of the page. Some shows to consider: the Story of the Stars puppet show, Space Dog, and Jammin on Jupiter.

The Seattle Public Library summer reading theme this year is “Explore Your World.”

Movies

I have a full post about cinema morning movies, outdoor movies in the parks, and drive-in theaters: https://gooddayswithkids.com/2019/06/23/summer-movies-2019/

Concerts:

Red Tricycle has already assembled this great Guide to Free (and Cheap) Summer Concerts. It includes info about kid-friendly concerts – some free, some pricey. At the Ballard Locks, the zoo, Issaquah’s Spring Free trampoline, U Village, downtown Seattle, Seattle Center, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Kirkland, Issaquah, Sammamish, Everett, Kenmore, Redmond, and Tukwila. Also check out ParentMap’s listings: www.parentmap.com/article/outdoor-summer-entertainment-for-families-seattle-eastside-north-sound

Other Activities for Kids in the Seattle area:

If you’re looking for other fun ideas for the summer, check out my series on “Cheap Dates with Toddlers and Young Kids”,  or reviews of Eastside Parks or find hands-on STEM enrichment activities for kids age 3 – 7 at www.InventorsOfTomorrow.com.

For school year activities, if you have kids age birth to 7, check out info about info about fabulous classes at local community colleges that are great for kids AND include parent education for you,- register now before they fill up!!

 

Summer Movies 2019

Whether you’re looking for outdoor movies to enjoy those warm summer evenings, or indoor movie clubs for those hot summer mornings when you really just need some A/C, or a drive-in movie, here are some options in the Seattle / King County area for summer 2019.

Kids’ Summer Movie Clubs

As you may remember from your own childhood, these are probably the cheapest, easiest way to entertain your kids for two hours on a summer morning…

Outdoor Movies

Below, I list all the outdoor movie series in King County. All information is current as of 6/23/19 – but check individual websites for updates or changes! Most movies are PG rated. I tried to note where they are PG-13 or R.

Note: all outdoor movies start around “dusk”. In  the Pacific Northwest, that means starting around 9 – 9:30 pm in July and 8:30 – 9 in August, so outdoor movies aren’t compatible with early bedtimes.

Get some handy tips / etiquette advice for outdoor movies here and here. Top tips are: go early for good seating location, bring a sweatshirt and blankets, as the weather cools quickly after dark, and if you bring a chair, make sure it’s a low profile chair so you don’t block anyone’s view. It doesn’t hurt to have a flashlight to find your way to the bathroom or port-a-potty – just be sure to shine it only at the ground in front of you.

By Day of Week

Tuesdays

  • Downtown Movies in the Park at Bellevue’s Downtown Park.  Pre-movie activities at 7:30. FREE entertainment, popcorn and movies – each week has a non-profit partner, and you’re encouraged to donate to support these programs. 7/9 Hotel Transylvania 3, 7/16 Dog’s Way Home, 7/23 Smallfoot, 7/30 How to Train… 8/6 Lego Movie 2, 8/12 Ferdinand, 8/20 Wonder Park, 8/27 Back to the Future.

Wednesdays:

  • Movies at Marymoor Park in Redmond. 7/10 – 8/28. Mostly on Wednesdays, EXCEPT Tues 8/13, and Thurs 8/22.  Some weeks are kid movies, some are teen/adult movies – check schedule. $5 per person ($6 credit), $5 to park. Seating opens 6:30. Live entertainment, trivia, food trucks, vendors. 7/10 Ferris Bueller (PG-13), 7/17 Bohemian Rhap (PG-13), 7/24 Spider-verse, 7/31 Top Gun, 8/7 Incredibles 2, 8/13 Sandlot, 8/22 Grease (PG-13), 8/28 Princess Bride
  • Movies at the Square in Kenmore.  FREE. Food trucks and pre-show entertainment at 8:00 p.m. 7/10 A Dog’s Way Home; 7/24 How to Train… 8/7 Mary Poppins Returns, 8/21 Capt. Marvel.

Thursdays:

  • Movies in the ParkSnohomish County. 7/22 Goonies Darrington, 7/18 Ralph Breaks… Darrington, 7/25 Incredibles 2 – Snohomish, 8/1 How to Train 3 – Snohomish, 8/8 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (PG-13) Lake Stevens, 8/15 Mary Poppins Returns – Lake Stevens.
  • Crossroads Movies in the Park, Bellevue. August 1 – 22. FREE entertainment, popcorn, movie. Entertainment starts at 7:30. 8/1 Christopher Robin, 8/8 Ralph Breaks the Internet, 8/15 Incredibles 2, 8/22 Mary Poppins Returns
  • Peddler Brewing in Ballard / Seattle. May 30 – Aug 29 (13 movies!). FREE. A few PG, but more PG-13 or R-rated fare.
  • Summer Movies in Green Lake ParkSeattle. 7/25 Black Panther, 8/8 Incredibles 2

Thursdays / Fridays

  • Chateau Ste. Michelle moviesWoodinville. $12 adult, $8 kids. Food trucks and wine for purchase. Movies at 8 pm. Thur 6/27 Goonies, Fri 7/5 Jurassic Park, Thur 7/11 Princess Bride, Fri 8/2 10 Things I Hate, Fri 9/27 Office Space – movie at 7:30.

Fridays

  •  Auburn’s Summer Sounds. Free. Food trucks, inflatable rides, art activities, and live music. Fri 7/26 – Lea Hill Park – Incredibles 2, 8/2 – Sunset Park – Ralph Breaks…, 8/9 – Les Gove Park, E.T.
  • Everett Cinema Under the Stars. Entertainment, movie begins between 8:30 and 9:30. FREE. 7/19 Incredibles 2, 7/26 Ralph Breaks… 8/2 Lego Movie 2, 8/9 Spider-verse (rated PG-13), 8/16 How to Train…
  • Sail-In CinemaEverett. Watch from your boat or the shore! 7/19: Battleship, 7/26: Transformers; 8/2 Remember the Titans, 8/9 Pirates of the Caribbean, 8/16 The Proposal, 8/23 Moana.
  • Movies in the Park, Pierce County. FREE, 7/12 Bolt Puyallup, 7/26 Lego Movie 2 Puyallup, 8/16 Little Mermaid (not the Disney version), Tacoma, 8/23 Dumbo 2019 Puyallup.
  • Yesler Outdoor Summer Movies, Seattle. FREE. 7/12 Sandlot, 7/19 Ferris Bueller, 7/26 Ghostbusters; 8/2 Goonies, 8/9 Hidden Figures, 8/16 Black Panther.
  • Skyway Outdoor CinemaSkyway. FREE. 8/2 Incredibles 2, 8/9 Princess Bride, 8/16 Aquaman (PG-13), 8/23 Spiderverse.
  • Movies in the Park, Tacoma. FREE. 7/19 – Incredibles 2 – Kandle Park; 7/27 Ralph Breaks… Wright Park, 8/9 Mary Poppins Returns – Center at Norpoint; 8/16 How to Train 3 – Stewart Heights, 8/23 Spiderverse – STAR Center
  • Edmonds Outdoor Movie Nites. Frances Anderson Fields. 7/26 Trolls, 8/2 A Wrinkle in Time
  • Movies Under the MoonMonroe, Lake Tye Park.  FREE. 8/2 Incredibles 2, 8/9 Ralph Breaks… 8/16 Mary Poppins Returns, 8/23 Black Panther.
  • Outdoor Maritime Movies, Center for Wooden Boats, SLU Seattle. Free, suggested donation $5. June 28 Wind, July 26th The Life Aquatic (R), Aug 23 Captain Ron. (PG-13)

Fridays/Saturdays

  • Center City Outdoor Cinema. Seattle. At Cascade Playground – CP, Westlake Park – WP, Hing Hay Park – HH, and Freeway Park – FP. Fri 7/12 Spiderverse – CP, Aquaman (PG-13) – WP. Fri 7/19 Up – CP, Christopher Robin – WP. Fri 7/26 Shrek – CP. Fri 8/2 – Spiderverse – FP, Willy Wonka (original) – WP.  Sat 8/3 – Crazy Rich Asians (PG-13) – HH. Fri 8/9 – Best in Show (PG-13) -FP, Jurassic Park (PG-13) – WP. Sat 8/10 Iron Monkey (Cantonese – PG-13) – HH. Fri 8/16 Won’t You Be my Neighbor – FP, Capt Marvel (PG-13) – WP. Sat 8/17 Mirai – HH. Fri 8/23 – Crazy Rich Asians (PG-13) – FP, Incredibles 2 – WP. Sat 8/24 Up – HH. Fri 8/30 Labyrinth – FP,

Saturdays:

  • Renton Outdoor Movies. 7/20 Aquaman (PG-13) at Piazza Park – FREE; 8/9 How to Train at Henry Moses Aquatic- $5. 8/16 Incredibles 2 at Tiffany Park – FREE.  8/23 – Spiderverse at Highlands Park – FREE
  • Carillon Point, Kirkland. $5 donation benefits Hopelink. 7/6 Mean Girls (PG-13), 7/20 – Crazy Rich Asians (PG-13), 8/17 Solo (PG-13),
  • Movies at the Mural at Seattle Center. FREE. 7/27 Princess Bride, 8/3 Crazy Rich Asians (PG-13),  8/10 Bohemian Rhapsody (PG-13), 8/17 Dirty Dancing (PG-13),  8/24 Black Panther (PG-13)
  • Seattle Outdoor Cinema (formerly Fremont Outdoor Cinema) at the South Lake Union Discovery Center. Suggested donation of $5 – goes to local charities. Grown-up Movies, age 21+. June 22 – The Matrix, July 20 – Bill and Ted’s… August 17th or 24th(?) Life Aquatic.
  • Cinema Under the StarsColumbia City / Seattle. 7/20 – Spiderverse, 8/17 – Lego Movie 2. Food bank donations accepted.
  • Popcorn in the ParkMarysville. FREE. 7/13 A Dog’s Way, 7/20 Ralph Breaks… 7/27 Bumblebee, 8/3 Incredibles 2, 8/10 Karate Kid
  • Drive in Movies at America’s Car Museum in Tacoma, parking starts at 4:30, movies at dusk. Free. 7/6 Ferris Bueller (PG-13), 7/27 The Goonies, 8/10 How to Train 3, 8/24 Capt. Marvel (PG-13).

Other lists of outdoor movies 2019: The Stranger, Seattle Times, Seattle Met. I’ve made sure my list included all the King County ones, and most Sno / Pierce County, but they have some Skagit and Kitsap options too.

Outdoor Movies by Region

Seattle: Thursdays Peddler Brewing, Fridays Center for Wooden Boats, Fri/Sat Center City, Saturdays Movies at the Mural, Seattle Outdoor Cinema, Cinema Under the Stars

Eastside: Tuesdays downtown Bellevue, Wednesdays Marymoor, Thursdays Crossroads, Saturdays Carillon Point

Snohomish County / North King: Wednesdays in Kenmore, Thursdays Sno Co, Thursday/Fridays at Chateau Ste. M, Fridays in Edmonds, Monroe, Everett Cinema under the Stars, and Sail-In Everett, Saturdays in Marysville

Pierce Country / South King: Fridays in Auburn, Skyway, Puyallup and Tacoma (x2), Saturdays in Renton and Tacoma.

Obsolete

West Seattle movies (Facebook) will not be holding outdoor movies in 2019. Some series that happened in 2018 but have not announced 2019 as of 7/3: Movies at the Marina – Shilshole. https://threedollarbillcinema.org/outdoorcinema

Movie series which others may tell you about, but which seem to no longer happen: Thursdays at Magnuson Park. Redhook Brewery Moonlight Cinema.

Drive-In Movies

There aren’t many classic drive-ins left… and when you search for them online, you’re likely to find out of date listings. For example, http://www.driveinmovie.com/WA.htm has recently been updated, but http://www.driveintheater.com/drivlist.htm lists Samish in Bellingham, which was demolished in 2004. Here’s what’s still open within a two hour drive from Seattle:

The only other one in the state is Auto-vue Drive-in – Colville, WA. 6 hours from Seattle. www.facebook.com/Auto-Vue-Drive-In-Theatre-120740527937813/

Movies start at dusk… see note above. If you go to a drive-in, PLEASE spend lots of money at concessions!!! That’s what will keep these classic theaters open in future summers!!

Parent Guides to Media

If you’re looking for advice on whether a particular movie is kid appropriate, check out Common Sense Media which provides reviews of movies, books, TV shows, games, apps and websites. In their movie reviews, they look at educational value, positive role models, positive messages, violence and scariness level, sexy stuff, language, consumerism and substances, providing information so parents can make their own informed decisions about what’s right for their child.

Kids in Mind also offers film reviews which rate, on a scale of 1 – 10, the level of sex/nudity, violence/gore, profanity and substance use in a movie. They also give detailed descriptions of each incident they counted, for parents to consider.

I also wrote a post on “When to Introduce Your Child To ______” which talks about things to consider when deciding whether your child is ready yet for favorite series like the MCU, Star Wars, and more.

Other Kid Activities:

If you’re looking for other fun ideas for the summer, check out my series on “Cheap Dates with Toddlers and Young Kids”,  or reviews of Eastside Parks or find hands-on STEM enrichment activities for kids age 3 – 7 on my other blog at www.InventorsOfTomorrow.com.

For school year activities, if you have kids age birth to 7, check out info about fabulous parent education classes at local community colleges that are great for kids AND include parent education for you – register now for fall, before they fill up!!

Note: If I missed any outdoor movie series in King County, let me know!!